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ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Nagesh Bhat, Pratibha Sultane, Sakshi Chhabra, Somesh Choudhary, Nandini Sen, Jolly Thakker, Deekshita Patel, Reenu Joshi

Assessment of Patient Satisfaction toward Dental Care Services of Patients visiting Dental Schools in Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

[Year:2017] [Month:January-March] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:81] [Pages No:34-41][No of Hits : 633]


ABSTRACT

Introduction: Dental problems are normal now a days. Major and minor oral and dental problems require dental schools and hospital services for overall population. Patient satisfaction with dental care also will impact the future usage of the utilization of dental services.

Objective: To assess the patient satisfaction towards the quality of dental care services provided by dental schools, Udaipur, Rajasthan.

Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 hundred patients’ of two recognized dental schools of Udaipur, Rajasthan. Self-administered structured questionnaire was used to measure the criteria affecting patient’s satisfaction according to Patient’s knowledge, Patientdentist interaction, Technical competency (TC), Administrative efficiency (AE), dental school set-up environment (DS). Percentages, means and standard deviation were calculated for qualitative and quantitative data. Chi-square test (X2) was performed to statistically analyze qualitative data. A p-value of 0.05 was considered.

Results: Highly significant difference was found between the association of place (rural and urban) and characteristics of four discipline of satisfaction.

Conclusion: The outcomes showed that the patient was satisfied by the patient-dentist interaction, TC, AE and DS. This survey provided a means of assessing satisfaction of the patients currently receiving treatment in the Dental schools. The results could facilitate focusing on patient complaints and attending to the concerns of dissatisfied patients.

Keywords: Dental services, Health care quality, Patient satisfaction.

How to cite this article: Bhat N, Sultane P, Chhabra S, Choudhary S, Sen N, Thakker J, Patel D, Joshi R. Assessment of Patient Satisfaction toward Dental Care Services of Patients visiting Dental Schools in Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. Int J Oral Care Res 2017;5(1):34-41.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Bhumika K Badiyani, Amit Kumar

Management of Dental Anxiety among Patients

[Year:2017] [Month:October-December] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:4] [Pages:89] [Pages No:317-322][No of Hits : 608]


ABSTRACT

Fear of dental treatment and anxiety about dental procedures are prevalent and have an impact on the oral health-related quality of life and the quality of treatment performed. Dental anxiety is often reported as a cause of irregular dental attendance, delay in seeking dental care, or even avoidance of dental care. Dental anxiety varies in intensity from patient to patient. The present review article has highlighted the possible types of dental fear and anxiety, their origins in dentistry, and current knowledge on management of patients with dental anxiety. If dentists are aware about the level of anxiety among their patients, they can anticipate patient’s behavior and be better prepared to take measures to help alleviate anxiety which eventually will help them to treat their patients better.

Keywords: Dental anxiety, Dental fear, Therapies and management.

How to cite this article: Badiyani BK, Kumar A. Management of Dental Anxiety among Patients. Int J Oral Care Res 2017;5(4):317-322.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
A Aravind, Libina Isahak, AN Dinsha, Mridusmita Pathak, Kevin Suresh, Sreerag Mohan

Evaluation of Plaque Removal Efficacy of Two Different Toothbrush Bristle Designs

[Year:2017] [Month:January-March] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:81] [Pages No:1-3][No of Hits : 538]


ABSTRACT

Introduction: Mechanical plaque control is the most effective method for preventing periodontal disease and dental caries. The various designs of toothbrushes available in the market often put the common man in dilemma about the best design, and they often seek professional advice on this matter.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the plaque removal efficacy of two different toothbrush bristle design.

Materials and methods: The present study comprised 40 participants. Participants were randomly allotted as group I: Toothbrush with a flat bristle arrangement, and group II: Toothbrush with zigzag bristle arrangement. Baseline and after-intervention clinical examination was carried out by a single calibrated examiner to assess plaque by using Turesky-Gilmore-Glickman modification of Quigley-Hein Plaque Index.

Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups I and II at baseline and after intervention (0.141). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant difference between the baseline and after-intervention score in both groups I (0.0001***) and II (0.004**).

Conclusion: The present study concluded that there was no superior toothbrush bristle design found. The individual skills are more concerned in plaque removal efficacy than the bristle design.

Keywords: Bristle design, Dental plaque, Plaque index, Toothbrush.

How to cite this article: Aravind A, Isahak L, Dinsha AN, Pathak M, Suresh K, Mohan S. Evaluation of Plaque Removal Efficacy of Two Different Toothbrush Bristle Designs. Int J Oral Care Res 2017;5(1):1-3.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Nilax Mufti, Sonam Mufti, Khushboo Mufti

Stress and Anxiety in Patients undergoing Dental Extraction

[Year:2017] [Month:January-March] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:81] [Pages No:75-77][No of Hits : 526]


ABSTRACT

Dental treatment involving anesthetic injection and surgical extraction of teeth causes stress and anxiety, resulting in emotional uneasiness, prolonging the intervention and complicating postoperative recovery. A dental surgeon should consider that patients initially visit a dental office for treatment of surgical extraction of teeth with severe dental stress and anxiety which could be due to conditioning or learned responses which these patients might have experienced. Thus, a prior awareness of the patient’s predisposition to dental stress and anxiety must be assessed, enabling to take appropriate measures preoperatively to give anxiety-free dental treatment and better postoperative recovery.

Keywords: Dental anxiety, Dental extraction, Dental stress, Preoperative anxiety.

How to cite this article: Mufti N, Mufti S, Mufti K. Stress and Anxiety in Patients undergoing Dental Extraction. Int J Oral Care Res 2017;5(1):75-77.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Ajay Narayan, Suraj J Thomas, Augustine Daniel, Sabba Fatima, Renu A Mathew

An Overview of Oral Health in India: Current Scenario and Challenges

[Year:2016] [Month:October-December] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:4] [Pages:78] [Pages No:280-283][No of Hits : 5704]


ABSTRACT

India is the largest democracy and the second most populated country in the world. However, more than 70% of the people of India are residing in the villages. As far as dentists and their availability are concerned, to this huge population, the demand and supply ratio is far inadequate and insufficient. The dentists/ population ratio of India, on date, is 1:10,000. However, the reality is that in rural India, 1 dentist is serving over a population of 250,000. Thus, the real picture is not that simple as it seems. As we are about to step into the next decade, there lies an urgent need to analyze the dental work force of the country and to study the scope and future of dentistry in the coming years. Oral public health issues are grossly neglected in a developing country like India, the primary reason to which is the nonlife-threatening nature of oral health problems. Indian state governments are already financially overburdened to acknowledge the burden of orodental problems and its connection with the systemic health. State governments lack the capability to provide oral health services to all. So this review is mainly focusing on the current issues and strategies on dental workforce.

Keywords: Dental education, Dental homes, Dental manpower, Oral health, Teledentistry.

How to cite this article: Narayan A, Thomas SJ, Daniel A, Fatima S, Mathew RA. An Overview of Oral Health in India: Current Scenario and Challenges. Int J Oral Care Res 2016; 4(4):280-283.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Krunal Chokshi, Achala Chokshi, Savant S Sebastian, Anshad Zaheer, Sreerag Mohan, RS Dhanya

Newer Nonfluoride Remineralizing Agents: An Insight

[Year:2016] [Month:October-December] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:4] [Pages:78] [Pages No:291-296][No of Hits : 2411]


ABSTRACT

Modern-day dentistry has shifted its focus from Black’s “extension for prevention” to prevention of extension, however, the current ideology of dentistry stresses on management of noncavitated carious lesions noninvasively through remineralization in an attempt to prevent disease progression, and to improve strength, esthetics, and function of teeth. The oral cavity is an arena involving constant fight between remineralizing and demineralizing factors. This relationship determines the integrity and strength of the tooth structure. The lopsidedness leads to rapid demineralization and decomposition of the tooth structure. In recent past an irrefragable explosion of fervor in technologies for remineralization of enamel and dentin or desensitization of exposed dentin affected by dental erosion has taken place. Remineralization is an innate repair process of reinstating ions back in the hydroxyapatite’s lattice structure. The fundamental aspect is the use of remineralizing agents to tooth structure to control the demineralization/ remineralization activity. The present review draws attention to the current components available for remineralization therapy and its application in clinical practice.

Keywords: Demineralization, Fluoride, Hydroxyapatite, Remineralizing agents.

How to cite this article: Chokshi K, Chokshi A, Sebastian SS, Zaheer A, Mohan S, Dhanya RS. Newer Nonfluoride Remineralizing Agents: An Insight. Int J Oral Care Res 2016;4(4):291-296.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Isha Aggarwal, Manu Wadhawan, Vishesh Dhir

Myobraces: Say No to Traditional Braces

[Year:2016] [Month:January-March] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:85] [Pages No:82-85][No of Hits : 2290]


ABSTRACT

Comprehensive research has shown that mouth breathing, tongue thrusting, reverse swallowing, and thumb sucking are known as incorrect myofunctional habits that are the real causes of malocclusion. These habits limit the child’s craniofacial development resulting in orthodontic problems. Myobraces are the orthodontic appliances that are preformed functional orthodontic device, especially used in interceptive orthodontic cases. Its mechanism of action is a combination of a functional device, positioners, and a myofunctional therapy device. These appliances straighten the teeth as well as correct the development of jaws and any adverse oral habits that are caused due to underdeveloped jaws. The purpose of this study is to describe the appliance, in particular its structural characteristics and its mechanism of action.

Keywords: Myobraces, Myofunctional, Trainer system.

How to cite this article: Aggarwal I, Wadhawan M, Dhir V. Myobraces: Say No to Traditional Braces. Int J Oral Care Res 2016;4(1):82-85.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Renu A Mathew, Ajay Narayan, Eldho Babu, Vinnimary Oommen, Hisham Ibrahim, Sabba Fatima

Pit and Fissure Sealants: A Recent Advancement

[Year:2016] [Month:October-December] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:4] [Pages:78] [Pages No:284-287][No of Hits : 2274]


ABSTRACT

Tooth surfaces with pits and fissures are particularly vulnerable to caries development. With the permanent dentition, caries involving the occlusal surfaces account for almost 60% of total caries in children and adolescents, although occlusal surfaces account for only 12.5% of total tooth surface. Dental sealants are preventive dental treatment where pit and fissure of primary or permanent molar and premolar are filled with plastic material. Fissure sealants (FSs) prevent the early intervention of dental caries before it reaches to end-stage called as cavitations. Mainly, the pit and fissure sealants (PFS) are to prevent developing caries, which is achieved by blocking the surface, and prevents bacteria from getting stuck to it.

Keywords: Cost-effectiveness, Occlusal surfaces, Pit and fissure sealants, Preventive dentistry.

How to cite this article: Mathew RA, Narayan A, Babu E, Oommen V, Ibrahim H, Fatima S. Pit and Fissure Sealants: A Recent Advancement. Int J Oral Care Res 2016;4(4):284-287.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Satish Madathanapalli, Sanidhya Surana, Deepak Thakur, Pooja Ramnani, Sheetal Kapse

Physics Forceps vs Conventional Forceps in Extraction of Maxillary 1st Molar

[Year:2016] [Month:January-March] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:85] [Pages No:29-32][No of Hits : 1855]


ABSTRACT

In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on the atraumatic removal of teeth. The Physics Forceps are the latest innovation in dental extraction technology and they provide an efficient means for atraumatic dental extractions. We compared the Physics Forceps with the conventional forceps for the removal of maxillary 1st molars in 30 patients under the following parameters time taken, postoperative pain on 3rd-5th-7th day, incidence of crown/root/buccal plate fracture during extraction. There was a significant difference pertaining to the time taken (p = 0.006) and pain on the 3rd postoperative day (p = 0.031). There were no other significant differences between the groups in any other variable studied. On comparing all of the aforementioned parameters, we have found that the utility of the instrument is better in comparison to the conventional forceps.

Keywords: Atraumatic extraction, Conventional forceps, Maxillary 1st molar, Physics forceps.

How to cite this article: Madathanapalli S, Surana S, Thakur D, Ramnani P, Kapse S. Physics Forceps vs Conventional Forceps in Extraction of Maxillary 1st Molar. Int J Oral Care Res 2016;4(1):29-32.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
RS Dhanya, Archana P Betur, Aiswarya Bulusu, VJ Adarsh, Pramod V Koshy, Brilvin Pinto

Management of Biomedical Waste in Dental Clinics

[Year:2016] [Month:October-December] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:4] [Pages:78] [Pages No:288-290][No of Hits : 1803]


ABSTRACT

Dental waste can be hazardous to humans and the environment. Proper handling, treatment, and disposal of biomedical wastes are important elements of health care office. Properly designed and applied, waste management can be a relatively effective and an efficient compliance-related practice. Some wastes from health care facilities, however, are contaminated. If not disposed of properly, contaminated wastes may carry microorganisms that can infect the people who come in contact with the waste as well as the community at large. Care is required when disposing of clinical waste, to protect and maintain the immediate envi